Endless lives for tiny garments
02/09/2021

Endless lives for tiny garments

For the second time Hul le Kes uniquely mended and hand-dyed items from the RNTD collection that were no longer suitable to rent. Resulting in a fashionable ultra-sustainable capsule collection. Meet Emily Gray, Sjaak Hul le Kes end Sebastiaan Kramer, the people behind this unique collaboration. 



With you Gray Label RNTD becomes a full circle. It closes the loop as far as we can close it.

 

Why did this collaboration start?

   Sjaak: When we became a father, we started to orientate ourselves more broadly. Then we noticed how sustainable your brand is. We wanted to contribute, and your circular concept connects greatly with what we love to do most: making those unique pieces.
   Emily: With you Gray Label RNTD becomes a full circle. It closes the loop as far as we can close it.
   Sjaak: We must feel affinity with the brands that we work with, share mutual believes. I really feel that with you. I like that.

What is your goal with this collaboration?
   Sjaak: From my side, I hope that we can change people's mindsets on how to deal with clothing differently. It doesn't have to be bought; borrowing is a great option.
   Emily: Yes! And that something that otherwise ends up in the trash can be given a new life.
   Sjaak: It changes your perspective. I hope you will see that a stain or tear can also be something beautiful.

What do both brands have in common?

   Sjaak: That we both stand for sustainability, awareness, and circular thinking.
   Emily: The stories behind the brands have many similarities. That circular thinking you mention translates into staying away from fast fashion, showing the benefits of long-term use and re-us of things.

What is the process of your work? How do you kick-start your creativity?    
Sjaak: First we check per item what the 'damage' is. When this is a broken press stud or seam by example, we try to repair this. We commit ourselves to avoid machines and restore by hand and when this is done, we look after possible stains. The one stain is nice enough to stay, the other one gets a patch, and that's where the repairing ends. The second part of the process is about dyeing. We look into colour combinations and make dye baths with waste. Then we leave the item there for a few days, leaving the colours to develop naturally and it comes out very beautifully.

I hope that we create a community. First of all, by bundling brands, who understand and empathise with our way of thinking, who see that borrowing has just as much value as buying and that giving back can have added value.


What do you envision for the future?
   Sjaak: I hope that we create a community. First of all, by bundling brands, who understand and empathize with our way of thinking, who see that borrowing has just as much value as buying and that giving back can have added value.
   Emily: Yes, because that's where it goes in the end, that people bring back the clothes. I also think it is very important that we can create a reset among consumers about how to deal with clothing and waste and that things can be done differently. It's so valuable to unite this message: together we can inspire consumers on a larger scale.

How did you experience the first half year as a dad?

   Sjaak: Overwhelming. That new kind of love that arises in you is very intense and very beautiful. And I really like the new connection with my partner. We already shared like 24 hours a day, but now there is a different angle that brings us together.
   Sebastiaan: But we also had to get used to it. We are busy with our company and we had to find our way to combine this with our child. Nevertheless, it's a warm bath. I really like how it connects the family.

Which item cannot be missed in any child's wardrobe?

   Emily: 
The Onesie and the Swaddle. Two fundamental items for every baby. Look how much of these we’ve got laying here.
   Sjaak: I think of an item that reflects who you are as a parent, I would like that very much.

  

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